Artistic Adventures!

Are you feeling creatively inspired by the happy frenzy of colorful books on the outside of the library building? Do you want to acquire new art skills in drawing, painting, craft making, or photography? If so, you can find your inner artist by exploring the 700s in nonfiction! If you aren’t sure what you would like to pursue artistically, browsing through the entire section can lead to encounters with new and interesting art possibilities.  There are collections of art from various museums (709 Smithsonian), specific types of art (759.979 Tanner), as well as art from a particular time and place (709.45 Toman). These can give you an idea of what kinds of art you may want to learn more about.  

For “how to” books that develop technical skills for drawing and painting, a good place to start is Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain by Betty Edwards (741.2 Edwards). This book contains exercises that will help train your brain to be able to draw what you see from life. A delightfully whimsical book that can help you to develop both skills and whimsy is The Pencil Playbook : 44 Exercises for Mesmerizing, Marking, and Making Magical Art with Your Pencil by Ana Montiel (741.24 Montiel).

There are several books about pencil drawing that teach how to sketch buildings, people, wildlife, objects, and developing skills such as shading and perspective.  The books in 741 go into detail about drawing in both pencil and colored pencil, and how to make your art come alive as realism, fantasy, or illustration. Because drawing is a foundational skill for all two-dimensional art, these books can also help develop technical and compositional skills that are also used for oil pastels, painting, and photography.

Learning how to paint can feel overwhelming at first, but there are many books that break down the process into specific skills and techniques that build upon each other.  A quick look through the 750s will give you books about color, composition, texture, and some of the finer points about the differences between acrylic, oil, watercolor, or tempura paint. If you are unsure about the different types of art supplies, books about painting can help to explain the different effects and uses of each type of paint, as well as specific considerations. There are many photos of the art in progress that will show what the canvas looks like during various stages, which can help you to visualize each step. One word of caution, however: although art books show completed steps, they don’t always show the mistakes that often happen as part of the learning process (and can sometimes lead to new discoveries!). In addition to painting on canvas, you can also read about painting murals (751.73 Grund), objects (745.723 Edwards), and henna (391.6 Roome). If you want to do art while simultaneously playing with your iPad, there is even a book that will teach you how to do that (776 Jardine).

If you love paper, ephemeral documents, and preserving memories, scrapbooking is a great way to combine all of those.  To learn more, look in 745.593 for lots of tips and techniques that will turn your pretty paper and photographs into beautiful memories. More paper fun can be found with collage, including Collage with Color: Create Unique, Expressive Collages in Vibrant Color (702 Davies) and Collage Lab: Experiments, Investigations, and Exploratory Projects (702.81 Shay). 

Finally, if you want a truly self-referential experience, you can make books into art with Alter This! Radical Ideas for Transforming Books into Art (745.593 Hennessy)! While you should never alter library books in any way, old books can be given a new life as artwork and can be a great way to display both creativity and a love of reading.

Lifelong Library Learning

As students prepare for a new school year, everyone who wants to learn has the opportunity to do so at the Chickasha Public Library. One of the great things about public libraries is that education and information are freely available to everyone, which makes it a great place for self-directed learning. There are opportunities for both current students, as well as those who have been out of school for a long time, to fill in subject area gaps, study for exams, review past knowledge, and find out more about something completely new and fascinating.

For those wanting to learn something specific, Universal Class is a database that offers over 500 free online courses that can be used for continuing education credits, to develop new office skills, or simply because the subject looks interesting. From the Chickasha Public Library homepage, click on E-Resources to find several educational databases, and then click on Universal Class. There are courses in all academic subjects, as well as computer training, business, career training, resume writing, homeschooling, genealogy, test preparation, and writing skills. In addition to practical knowledge, there are also more esoteric and interest-based courses, including digital photography, landscaping, habits of millionaires, clutter control, meditation, cake decorating, innovative thinking, speed reading, and the art of breathing. You can take as many of these courses as you want and work at your own pace.

Another online database is EBSCOhost (also listed on E-Resources), which provides free access to academic sources for research and writing papers. This provides students with reliable, peer-reviewed information and studies that are often hidden by online paywalls. In addition, a toolbar on the side can show how to cite that article using different formats.

If you prefer learning through print books, there are many of those as well. There are study guides for all of the major academic exams (SAT, SAT, PSAT, GED, GRE), as well as for police, fire, postal, and military exams. Individual subject areas can be found throughout the nonfiction section. Staff can help find books about specific information, such as how to use an iPhone (004.1675 Pogue), increasing your Spanish vocabulary (463.2 Larousse), vehicle repair (629), writing a resume (650.14 Rosenberg), World War 2 (940.5), Oklahoma history (976.6), or extraterrestrial worlds (999).

If you are a beginner in a particular area, any book in the “for dummies” series is a good option for learning the basics of something before moving on to more advanced or specialized material. There are also many books in the 900s that can give a broad, general overview of historical events or geographic areas.

Wandering through the stacks and browsing through books is also a highly recommended way to encounter all kinds of knowledge. It is also a great way to gain an appreciation of just how much information there is to learn about everything. Whether it is something as specific as sailing knots (623.8882 Altimiras) and soil management (635.0489 Reid), or the latest scientific discovery (500s), learning is a never-ending process that lasts a lifetime. While it is impossible to understand the totality of human knowledge (which is always increasing), it can be fun to try to learn as much as possible about a variety of different subjects.

Finally, if you would like to learn about a specific title or subject that the library does not yet have, you can always talk to staff about a material request, and we will try to find something for you. Finding information is what we do and connecting people with the resources for intellectual discovery and educational attainment benefits the entire community.

Library History Display

As you walk into the library, you might notice a new display case next to the Bill Wallace display. The new case, still in progress, contains items and documents relating to the people and events during the early years of this library. Founded in 1905 as a Carnegie Library (the current building was constructed on the same site in 1964), the Chickasha Public Library was the first free public library in what was then Indian Territory, and it has been operating continuously for 116 years.

On the top shelf is a copy of Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales, which was one of the first books added to the library’s collection in 1905. There is also a photograph of Sallie Thompson (1870-1936), who served as the first, fourth, and eighth librarian of the Carnegie Library between 1905 and 1929. At times she was the only staff member; she also occasionally worked without pay in order to keep the library open. A small square photo next to Sallie Thompson depicts school children arriving with donated books for the opening of the Carnegie Library on March 23, 1905. This photo was taken from the second floor of the library building.

The next shelf contains a handwritten librarian’s report from 1907, a postcard showing the Carnegie Library, a photograph of library board president Stella Brown (1861-1911), as well as Stella Brown’s 1906 resignation letter, in which she called the library “a great success.”

The photograph on the third shelf is Frances Manby Hamilton (1860-1919), a prominent library supporter who greeted people as they entered the Carnegie Library for the first time on March 23, 1905. Frances Hamilton is looking in the direction of the front door so that her photograph can continue to greet people as they enter the library. A small paper brochure from 1962 proclaims “A New Library for Chickasha” and gave information to the public about the need for a new building because the Carnegie building had fallen into disrepair and was unsafe. Next to the brochure is an invitation to the opening of the new Chickasha Public Library when the building was completed in 1964. There are also a few newspaper clippings about the library’s beginnings.

The very bottom shelf contains the first accession book where Sallie Thompson recorded the donated books that made up the entire initial collection, as well as handwritten record books containing receipts, notes, expenses, and other daily tasks, from the 1930s through the 1950s.

Finally, there is a framed document on the wall between the display cases. This was from the very first meeting of the Carnegie Library Committee in April 1904, where the women’s club members who had applied for and received a $10,000 grant from Andrew Carnegie began planning and organizing their fundraising and public awareness campaigns. The process of maintaining, adapting, and growing the library with new information, formats, books, technology, and resources is an ongoing process that continues to this day. 

The documents and photos currently on display are just a small part of the treasures that have been found in dusty boxes and drawers. Everything from letters, library board meeting minutes, notes scrawled on the back of envelopes, financial records, newspaper clippings, receipts, and book acquisitions can give clues that illuminate the daily life of the library as experienced by its staff, as well as the public. Many of these documents were used as primary sources for research while writing the history of this library (available to check out or to purchase for #10) and are tangible representations of the past and the historical context in which the library existed. 

The purpose of the history display is to make these photos and documents available to everyone so that anyone who visits the Chickasha Public Library can learn about and appreciate its role in the intellectual and cultural life of this community during the past 116 years. This library continues to build on that historical foundation while also continuing to evolve to meet the informational and recreational needs of the community.

Book your next travel adventure!

After a year of staying home, cabin fever has set in and many people are thinking about their next trip, whether real or imaginary. Traveling to different parts of the world is one of the best ways in which to interact with and learn from the many cultures, languages, beliefs, and histories that make up the varied experiences of our shared humanity. Unfortunately, travel can also be expensive, but you can always plan and learn about different travel experiences for free by exploring some of the many books at the Chickasha Public Library!

Do you find yourself wondering about faraway people and places that you have not had the chance to visit? How about a place you know absolutely nothing about or a place you have always been interested in? The great thing about the Chickasha Public Library’s collection is that there are no limits to what you can learn and discover. If you are interested in browsing through geographical Dewey decimal categories, look in 914 (Europe), 915 (Asia), 916 (Africa), 917 (North America), 918 (South America), and 919 (Australia and New Zealand). If you read one book from each continent, it can be an easy way to take a mental trip around the world. Reading about the cultural attractions and historic landmarks from different countries and continents can help you plan a future trip, learn more about the languages and history of different places, and find the most beautiful scenery.

Traveling within Oklahoma is relatively accessible and inexpensive for many people, which makes it easy to explore for both quick getaways, as well as longer vacations. It can also be a fun way to experience your familiar home state with fresh eyes. Oklahoma: off the beaten path (917.66 Palmer) can help you discover new and interesting places close to home. Find your next outdoor adventure with Oklahoma hiking trails (917.66 Frates), explore history with Historical atlas of Oklahoma (911.766 Goins), or plan a spooky trip with Weird Oklahoma: your travel guide to Oklahoma’s local legends and best kept secrets (133.109766 Treat).

For road trip enthusiasts, Drives of a lifetime: 500 of the world’s most spectacular trips (910.202 Bellows) describes some of the world’s most beautiful places in which to drive. If you are looking to find pockets of various cultures while embarking on a road trip closer to home, Abroad at home: the best international travel in North America (917.304 Abroad) will help you to visit some of those places without having to buy a plane ticket.

If you want to further immerse yourself in learning about someplace new, there are also language books and dictionaries, biographies and memoirs written by people from various countries, books about how various cultures interconnect with one another, and history books that can give insight into how and why the past continues to affect current events. Reading about different perspectives can give valuable insights into others’ experiences and develop an understanding and appreciation of diversity both at home and around the world. It is never too late to learn about someplace new, or to find new information about somewhere you have already visited. And reading travel books can also give you new ideas about where you might want to go next!    

Finally, if you are feeling creative and would like to start your own country, you can find some examples in An atlas of countries that don’t exist: a compendium of fifty unrecognized and largely unnoticed states (911 Middleton). Imaginary countries can be delightfully whimsical, and they require an incredible amount of ingenuity and problem-solving skills to develop and maintain. Learning about some of these geographical quirks can also spur interest in how communities, states, and countries govern themselves, as well as the many ways in which borders are drawn. 

No matter where you want to go, there is a book for you here at the Chickasha Public Library!

Chickasha Public Library to Host Sing a New Song 2: Changing Lives Through Music

On Saturday, July 17th, the Chickasha Public Library will be hosting Sing a New Song 2: Changing Lives Through Music. Designed for adults and teens and presented by Peter Markes, the goal of this workshop is to develop techniques for songwriting lyrics through a process called sensory writing. The free, one-hour program will begin at 10 a.m., and registration is required due to limited seating. 

Peter Markes (pronounced Marcus) is an award-winning music educator and performer based out of Oklahoma City. Audiences are mesmerized by his one-man band live-looping performances where he takes his 5-string electric violin to create and build pop hits from scratch! Also a guitarist and singer-songwriter, Peter has written and released numerous songs in the folk-pop genre, and his debut solo album, I Have A Dream, can be heard digitally worldwide. He is also a member of the band Kyle Dillingham & Horseshoe Road and has performed and taught in over thirty countries.

Workshop attendees will learn about the process of lyric writing and how that can be used to create songs. The information will be accessible to everyone, regardless of the amount of previous musical experience. 

“Music is an essential part of the human experience,” said Michelle Skinner, a Chickasha Public Library employee. “It is a universal language that connects us all together, as well as a powerful means of communication and self-expression.”

Learning musical skills has many mental and physical health benefits as well. According to researchers from Johns Hopkins University, listening to music can reduce anxiety, blood pressure, and pain as well as improve sleep quality, mood, mental alertness, and memory. Learning and creating new music, such as songwriting, keeps the brain active, helps to preserve memory function, and helps with language and verbal literacy. By engaging the brain in a variety of ways, music enhances both emotional and cognitive functioning. This workshop is a great way to learn about and explore new forms of self-expression while also having fun and developing new forms of creativity.

This program is funded through the Oklahoma Department of Libraries with a federal grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services. The program will be in person at the Chickasha Public Library, located at 527 W. Iowa. Registration is required due to limited seating. For more information and to register for Sing a New Song: Changing Lives Through Music, visit or call the Chickasha Public Library at 405-222-6075.

National Library Week!

National Library Week is April 4-10, 2021, and this year’s theme is “Welcome to Your Library!” According to the American Library Association, this theme “promotes the idea that libraries extend far beyond the four walls of a building – and that everyone is welcome to use their services.”  The Chickasha Public Library provides access to a variety of information, services, resources, and programs, both physical and virtual, to everyone in the community.  During National Library Week, the Chickasha Public Library will be celebrating its resources, users, staff, volunteers, support groups, and the many ways in which it reflects and serves this community. 

There are many ways to celebrate and promote libraries. You can show your library love by participating in the #MyLibraryIs social media campaign during National Library Week for a chance to win a $100 Visa gift card.  Monday, April 5th The State of America’s Libraries 2021 Special Report: COVID-19 will be released. Tuesday, April 6th is National Library Workers Day, Wednesday, April 7th is National Library Outreach Day, think bookmobile among other programs not held within a library building, and Thursday, April 8th is Take Action for Libraries Day.  The American Library Association encourages people to support the Build America’s Libraries Act, which will “fund upgrades to the nation’s library infrastructure to address challenges such as natural disasters, COVID-19, broadband capacity, environmental hazards, and accessibility barriers.”

The American Library Association lists several different activities in which people can support libraries during National Library Week. These include showing appreciation to library staff in person and on social media on National Library Workers Day, highlighting the library’s community contributions and involvement, communicating how libraries provide essential resources, services, and information to their communities, and advocating for library funding and support within local, state, and federal governments.  You can highlight libraries on social media using the #NationalLibraryWeek, and #LibrariesTransform hashtags, and by following the American Library Association and I Love Libraries.

American Library Association has also created a word search and coloring pages for National Library Week. Click on each link below to view and print each one.

National Library Week Word Search Activity Page (PDF)

Word Search Answers (PDF)

National Library Week Coloring Page (PDF)

National Library Week Coloring Page in Spanish (PDF)

Finally, a great way to celebrate National Library Week is to visit the Chickasha Public Library, where you can also find several books about public libraries and their continuing impact on individuals and communities.  If you are looking for a history of public libraries, Part of Our Lives: A People’s History of the American Public Library by Wayne Wiegand (027.473 Wiegand) discusses the value and relevance of public libraries as a whole throughout the history of this country.  Closer to home, A History of the Chickasha Public Library, 1905-2020: The First 115 Years by library staff member Michelle Skinner (027.476 Skinner) is about the history of this specific library (and a copy can also be purchased for $10 at the library).   

More perspectives of libraries written by staff from other libraries include Dewey: The Small-Town Library Cat Who Touched the World by Vicki Myron (636.80092 Myron) and Free For All: Oddballs, Geeks, and Gangstas in the Public Library by Don Borchert (BIOGRAPHY Borchert), a humorous memoir about some of the more unusual and entertaining aspects of working in a public library. 

Come to the Chickasha Public Library and discover the many resources it has to offer during National Library Week!  We hope to see you there! 

Meaningful Mental Meanderings

It has been a little over a year since the COVID-19 pandemic began to affect daily life in Chickasha and Grady County. 2020 saw many changes to everyday life as normal routines were upended and interrupted, and people everywhere began to face unprecedented medical, economic, and social challenges. Many people have also felt some of the intangible ways in which the pandemic has disrupted the established trajectory of their lives. These internal struggles can include the loss of a sense of time, a general feeling of ennui, brain fog, and the vague, unsettling feeling that you must be doing something productive yet feeling powerless to do so. 

While there are no easy solutions to uncertainties of this past year, books can help to ease some of the mental strain by providing accessible, self-directed learning and recreation, as well as a much-needed distraction from some of life’s more pressing worries. One book that addresses overcoming mental blocks is Tinker Dabble Doodle Try: Unlock the Power of the Unfocused Mind by Srinivasan S. Pillay (153.4 Pillay). The premise is that unfocusing your mind and letting it wander is key to unlocking its potential for both logical problem solving and creative thinking. Some of the ways in which to do that include self-talk, reverie, mind wandering, and “the all-important tool of daydreaming.”

The reason for this is that too much intense focus often leads to mental stress, which significantly narrows the range of ideas and is overly reliant on established neurological patterns. The kind of focus that produces scientific discoveries or writes engaging books is intense, but it is also very similar to Csikszentmihalyi’s “flow theory,” where the process of thinking or doing something is so enjoyable that it becomes its own reward.

One solution is to set aside time engaged in mental relaxation, which leads to both cognitive and emotional benefits. When there is no pressure to accomplish a specific task, the brain is free to form new connections and pathways that would otherwise not be possible. This is also very much aligned with the growth mindset, which asserts that the ability to think and learn is a skill that can be developed within everyone. 

There is a chapter dedicated to developing and cultivating creative thinking skills, which are often seen as an innate characteristic that happens with no explanation. However, as someone who spends a lot of time involved in creative pursuits, my experience is that creativity happens by developing new thoughts and ideas in unexpected places, making all the mistakes, and then problem-solving ways to correct all the mistakes, always being ready to learn new things, and having so much fun that I do not want to do anything else.

Neurological perceptions and thinking patterns are also highly individualized in many ways. Understanding your cognitive rhythm and interests can allow you to experience new intellectual horizons. The Chickasha Public Library provides many books that will enhance your cognitive abilities and focus in a variety of areas. This book, as well as many others in the NF 100s (philosophy and psychology) can open up new and fascinating worlds about the wonders of the life of the mind.  Tinker Dabble Doodle Try is a good way to learn how to quiet some of the brain chatter and create new paths of thinking, until one day (as this book beautifully puts it) “you will be fascinated by the jewels of your own intellect.”

National Library Week!

National Library Week is April 4-10, 2021, and this year’s theme is “Welcome to Your Library!” According to the American Library Association, this theme “promotes the idea that libraries extend far beyond the four walls of a building – and that everyone is welcome to use their services.”  The Chickasha Public Library provides access to a variety of information, services, resources, and programs, both physical and virtual, to everyone in the community.  During National Library Week, the Chickasha Public Library will be celebrating its resources, users, staff, volunteers, support groups, and the many ways in which it reflects and serves this community. 

There are many ways to celebrate and promote libraries. You can show your library love by participating in the #MyLibraryIs social media campaign during National Library Week for a chance to win a $100 Visa gift card.  Monday, April 5th The State of America’s Libraries 2021 Special Report: COVID-19 will be released. Tuesday, April 6th is National Library Workers Day, Wednesday, April 7th is National Library Outreach Day, think bookmobile among other programs not held within a library building, and Thursday, April 8th is Take Action for Libraries Day.  The American Library Association encourages people to support the Build America’s Libraries Act, which will “fund upgrades to the nation’s library infrastructure to address challenges such as natural disasters, COVID-19, broadband capacity, environmental hazards, and accessibility barriers.”

The American Library Association lists several different activities in which people can support libraries during National Library Week. These include showing appreciation to library staff in person and on social media on National Library Workers Day, highlighting the library’s community contributions and involvement, communicating how libraries provide essential resources, services, and information to their communities, and advocating for library funding and support within local, state, and federal governments.  You can highlight libraries on social media using the #NationalLibraryWeek, and #LibrariesTransform hashtags, and by following the American Library Association and I Love Libraries.

American Library Association has also created a word search and coloring pages for National Library Week. Click on each link below to view and print each one.

National Library Week Word Search Activity Page (PDF)

Word Search Answers (PDF)

National Library Week Coloring Page (PDF)

National Library Week Coloring Page in Spanish (PDF)

Finally, a great way to celebrate National Library Week is to visit the Chickasha Public Library, where you can also find several books about public libraries and their continuing impact on individuals and communities.  If you are looking for a history of public libraries, Part of Our Lives: A People’s History of the American Public Library by Wayne Wiegand (027.473 Wiegand) discusses the value and relevance of public libraries as a whole throughout the history of this country.  Closer to home, A History of the Chickasha Public Library, 1905-2020: The First 115 Years by library staff member Michelle Skinner (027.476 Skinner) is about the history of this specific library (and a copy can also be purchased for $10 at the library).   

More perspectives of libraries written by staff from other libraries include Dewey: The Small-Town Library Cat Who Touched the World by Vicki Myron (636.80092 Myron) and Free For All: Oddballs, Geeks, and Gangstas in the Public Library by Don Borchert (BIOGRAPHY Borchert), a humorous memoir about some of the more unusual and entertaining aspects of working in a public library. 

Come to the Chickasha Public Library and discover the many resources it has to offer during National Library Week!  We hope to see you there! 

Black History Resources at the Chickasha Public Library

“Those who have no record of what their forebears have accomplished lose the inspiration which comes from the teaching of biography and history” – Dr. Carter Godwin Woodson (1875-1950), historian, author, and founder of Black History Month

February was Black History Month, which highlights the history, culture, contributions, struggles, and achievements of African Americans.  However, learning about Black history should not be limited to February. Reading books written by Black authors is a great way to continue learning about both the past and present.  Anyone looking for Black history, perspectives, and representation can find many nonfiction resources at the Chickasha Public Library. 

Some historical works include African American Almanac: 400 Years of Triumph, Courage and Excellence by Lean’tin L. Bracks (973 Bracks), African-American Century: How Black Americans Have Shaped our Country by Henry Louis Gates (920 Gates), The Warmth of Other Suns: the Epic story of America’s Great Migration by Isabel Wilkerson (304.80973 Wilkerson), Crossing the Danger Water: Three Hundred Tears of African-American Writing (810.8 CRO), and Black Fortunes: The Story of the First Six African Americans who Escaped Slavery and Became Millionaires by Shomari Wills (338 Wills). 

There are also biographies, including Frederick Douglass: Prophet of Freedom (BIOGRAPHY Douglass), and Matter of Black and White: The Autobiography of Ada Lois Sipuel Fisher (BIOGRAPHY Fisher), who was born in Chickasha. For more local history, you can read Chickasha Black Heritage and One Room School Memories, both by Loretta Jackson (FRONT DESK 976.654 Jac; GEN 976.654 Jac) while at the library. 

Those looking for books about current events and perspectives can read The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness by Michelle Alexander (364.973 Alexander), How to be Antiracist by Ibram X. Kendi (305.800973 Kendi), Between the World and Me by Ta-Nehisi Coates (305.800973 Coates), and So You Want to Talk About Race by Ijeona Oluo (305.800973 Oluo). These books and many more can be found in the nonfiction and reference section of the library for anyone wanting to read about and expand their knowledge of Black history.     

Chickasha Public Library’s Services and Community Impact

The Chickasha Public Library, which has the distinction of being the first free library in what was then Indian Territory, was founded as a Carnegie Library on March 23, 1905.  This library has operated continuously for 115 years, and has grown and developed as new technology, resources, and information becomes available, and is a vital part of the educational and cultural landscape of this community. 

The library provides a variety of information, services, and resources for both education and recreational purposes to the residents of Chickasha and Grady County.  These services provide personal, social, and economic benefits in many different ways.

Since the beginning, the Chickasha Public Library has offered access to books and other printed material.  Library cards are free for anyone who lives, works, or goes to school in Grady County, and each person can check out up to 20 items at a time.  Besides printed books, there are audio books on CD, Playaways, magazines, and kits available.

Due to COVID-19, the library’s services are currently being delivered in modified ways to ensure public safety.  Individuals can call and reserve an appointment to visit the library to browse, check out books, or use the computer during available days and times.  Books can also be requested and held for curbside pickup either by phone or online through the library’s catalog.  Additional curbside services include printing (documents can be emailed to chickashapubliclibraryprinting@gmail.com), copying, and short-term laptop usage.  There is also a notary service free of charge. 

The library’s virtual services have been widely utilized during the pandemic.   Ebooks, audio books, and magazines are available through the Oklahoma Virtual Library and can be read on your Kindle, phone, tablet, or computer.  Sign in with your Chickasha Public Library card and then enter the last four digits of that number as the PIN. 

For those wanting to supplement online learning, Universal Class is a database containing over 500 courses (free with your library card) that cover academic subjects, technology usage, health, finance, workplace skills, and recreational hobbies.  Once completed, each course provides a certificate and CEUs that can be used for continuing education credits.  History and genealogy researchers can benefit from EBSO Host, OK2Explore, ProQuest Black Freedom Struggle, and Oklahoma Digital Prairie.  Free streaming movies are available through Kanopy. These databases and more can be found on the E-Resources tab on the library’s homepage.  Ancestry is also available at home for the duration of the pandemic and can be accessed by signing into your account on the library’s homepage. 

Regular programs, including Tai Chi and classes from the Oklahoma Healthy Aging Initiative, are currently accessible through Zoom.  Those who are interested in health literacy can participate in a community walking challenge, watch videos with healthy recipes on the library’s Facebook page, and check out kits with information about healthy living.  

Finally, anyone can call or email the library and receive information and help from the staff.  We will work to find new and innovative ways to search for answers to questions, find resources, help navigate the vast world of online information, and to provide contact information for official organizations.  For more information about any of these programs or services, please call the Chickasha Public Library at 405-222-6075.